5 Ways to Win Against Winter

For those of us in the Northeast the Fall winds (or last weekend’s snow!) can only lead to one place....leafless trees cold and snow. However a few simple tips can help your body prepare for the season and remain strong during this time of year.

  1. Avoid refined sugar...  Although a warm oven baking homemade chocolate chip cookies is a welcoming thought shelving the sweet tooth for the winter months is a good idea. Too much sugar can acidify the body which can lead to any number of problems including lack of energy depression infections and feeling cold. Being too acidic can also interfere with the beneficial bacteria in your gut which can weaken your immune system. Replace the sweet cravings with something savory like traditionally fermented organic pickles which are a good source of probiotics.
  2. Take some extra vitamin D to help cope with or squash S.A.D (seasonal affective disorder: the winter blues). Studies have indicated that low vitamin D may be a contributing factor to mood disorders like depression. The current RDA for adults is 600 IU/day with a safe upper limit of 4000 IU/day. However vitamin D research experts believe these doses are too low and indicate 2000 IU/day and sometimes 5000 IU/day is better. Getting your blood level checked at your next doctor’s visit will help determine the best dose for you. Since you do not generate vitamin D from the sun during the winter months seasonal supplementation may be worthwhile. We’re offering 10% off vitamin D products (full list below) for the next few weeks - call the office or order online while supplies last.
    1. Metagenics D3 5000
    2. Thorne D3 1000
    3. Xymogen D3 2000
    4. Xymogen D3 5000 Softgels
    5. Xymogen D3 Liquid
  3. Get into a sleep routine.  This is one of those simple things that busy parents and the rest of us can easily forget.  By training your body and mind to respond to the same times and triggers for sleep (perhaps reading for a half hour before bed avoiding your computer screen for an hour to rest your eyes a cup of decaf tea etc.) you can avoid sleep disorders like insomnia. In addition getting adequate sleep may improve memory alertness and decrease moodiness. Although sleep needs vary from individual to individual the average healthy adult requires about seven to eight hours of sleep per night. So as the days grow colder and shorter be like your furry outdoor neighbors and hibernate.
  4. Eat more leafy greens.  While this tip especially applies all year there are many creative and tasty ways to enjoy these veggies. Green leafy vegetables are packed with vital nutrients such as vitamins A C E magnesium folate calcium and iron. One of my favorite easy snack recipes is kale chips. All you do is devein and rip kale into bite size pieces. Toss with olive oil and sea salt and bake in the oven until crispy. (About 10 minutes at 350 degrees).  If greens don’t suit you a multivitamin and mineral supplement may be necessary for the winter months. Other supplements to improve the pesky signs of aging that pop up in colder weather include Borage oil Glucosamine Chondroitin and MSM and fish oil. Borage is good for dry skin and Glucosamine Chondroitin and MSM and fish oil may improve arthritis.  These are on sale while supplies last.
    1. Joint Rx
    2. Borage
    3. EPA-DHA Extra Strength Enteric Coated
    4. OmegaPure Softgels and Liquid
  5. And last but not least get your vitamin D naturally! Head somewhere warm and take a vacation! OK wouldn’t that be nice if it were that easy. If you can’t do that you can always bring the tropics to you by trying seasonal affective disorder prevention lights. These lights mimic natural outdoor light and claim to boost mood.

So as we approach the change of season turning back the clocks and the shorter days remember that there are ways to curb the sting of winter and to keep a little summer brewing internally. Before you know it the warm breeze and flowers will return.



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